Adrian Mole, The Later Years Sue Townsend 2018-05-29 As his laugh-out-loud secret diary extends into his later teens and young adulthood, everyone’s favorite angsty Brit remains “a brilliant comic creation” (The Times, London). Continue to commiserate with “one of literature’s most endearing figures”—a sharp-witted, pining, and achingly honest underdog of great expectations and dwindling patience who knows all (or believes he does) and tells all (The Observer). Having endured the agony of adolescence (just), Adrian now careens into his later teens, torturous twenties, and utterly disappointing thirties in these three hilarious sequels by “one of Britain’s most celebrated comic writers” (The Guardian). From the not-so-humble origins of The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 and ¾, Adrian’s chronicle of angst has sold more than twenty million copies worldwide, spawned seven sequels, been adapted for television, and staged as a musical—truly “a phenomenon” (The Washington Post). The True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole: What’s happening to Adrian Mole? On the one hand, he’s entering the cusp of adulthood and burgeoning success as a published poet. On the other, he still lives at home, refuses to part with his threadbare stuffed rabbit, and has lost his job at the library for a shocking act of impudence: He shelved Jane Austen under Light Romance. Even worse, someone named Sue Townsend stole his diaries and published them under her own name. Of course they were bestsellers. Adrian Mole: The Wilderness Years: At 23¾ years old, Adrian is now technically an adult and almost prepared. On the upside: He’s fallen for a perfectly lovely Nigerian waitress; he’s seeing a therapist so as to talk about himself without interruption; and he’s added vowels to his experimental novel-in-progress (so much more accessible to the masses!). The downside? Pandora is probably history; a pea-brained rival has been published before him to great acclaim; and worse—Adrian has come to the devastating realization that he may not be uncommon after all. Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years: At 34¾, impotent intellectual Adrian Mole is soon to be divorced; he hasn’t a clue what to do with his semi-stardom as a celebrity chef; his parents have become swingers (with whom is too shocking to go into now); his epic novel is still unpublished; his ex-flame Pandora is running for political office; and his younger sister has rebelled in the most distressingly common ways. There is one upside: Adrian’s son has inherited his mother’s unblemished skin. “Townsend’s wit is razor sharp” (Daily Mirror) as she shows us the world through the older and (possibly?) wiser eyes of her “achingly funny anti-hero” (Daily Mail), proving again and again why she’s been called “a national treasure” (The New York Times Book Review).
The Adrian Mole Collection Sue Townsend 2012-01-19 The hilarious, bestselling follow-ups to Sue Townsend's The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 and 3/4 : The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole, True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole and Adrian Mole: The Wilderness together in one volume. Sunday July 18th. My father announced at breakfast that he is going to have a vasectomy. I pushed my sausages away untouched. Charting nearly ten years in the life of Adrian Mole, from his increasingly troubled adolescence and schooling to his first job as newt counter for the DoE, from his parents' marital troubles to his own difficult relationship with Pandora, from the failure of his early poems to the even grander failure of his epic novels, these three novels in one volume provide a hilarious portrait of one young man's coming of age. 'He will be remembered some day as one of England's great diarists. No matter what your troubles may be Adrian Mole is sure to make you feel better' Evening Standard
The Lost Diaries of Adrian Mole, 1999-2001 Sue Townsend 2009-06-11 Adrian Mole has entered early middle age and is now ‘the same age as Jesus was when he died' (33). Father to the grammatically challenged Glenn, and William, who takes a ‘Big Boy Arouser’ condom to nursery school as his innocent contribution to a hot air balloon project, Adrian is a single parent who has an on/off relationship with his housing officer, Pamela Pigg. Will she help him to move from the notorious Gaitskell estate before William joins the Mad Frankie Fraser fan club? In the meantime, Adrian continues to be scandalised by his irresponsible parents who are conducting a matrimonial square-dance with the Braithwaites – the parents of the beautiful but unobtainable Pandora, who is ruthlessly pursuing her ambition to be New Labour’s first woman P.M. – and to confide in his diary. His current worries include: indestructible head-lice; his raging jealousy when his accomplished half-brother Brett arrives on his doorstep; moral decline in The Archers; his desperate attachment to two therapists; his mild addiction to Starburst (formerly Opal Fruits); a small earthquake in Leicester; and, perhaps most significantly, the dawn of a new millennium.
Queen Camilla Sue Townsend 2006 The queen abdicates and places Charles in the position of choosing between the throne and his wife.
The Lost Diaries of Adrian Mole, 1999-2001 Sue Townsend 2008 The adventures of 33-year-old Adrian Mole as he tries to deal with the people in his life and cope with all that life has to offer him.
The Complete Adrian Mole Series Sue Townsend 2012
Adrian Mole Sue Townsend
The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole Sue Townsend 1987-08 A British teenager struggles to cope with the day-to-day problems of adolescence
The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole Sue Townsend 2018-01-02 “Townsend’s wit is razor sharp” as her self-proclaimed intellectual adolescent hero continues his hilarious angst-filled secret diary (TheMirror). I can’t wait until I am fully mature and can make urban conversation with intellectuals. Growing up among inferiors in Great Britain isn’t easy for a sensitive fifteen-year-old “poet of the Midlands” like Adrian Mole, considering everything in the world is conspiring to scar him for life: His hormones are in a maelstrom; his mother is pregnant (at her age!); his girlfriend, Pandora, is in shutdown; radio stardom isn’t panning out; he’s become allergic to non-precious metals; and passing his exams is as dire a crisis as the Falkland Islands. From weathering a profound but shaky romance with the love of his life to negotiating his parents’ reconciliation to writing his poetry on restroom walls (why on earth did he sign his name?), “Adrian Mole is as engaging as ever” (Time Out). The sequel to the beloved TheSecret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾ continues Adrian’s chronicle of angst, which has sold more than twenty million copies worldwide, and been adapted for television and staged as a musical. Adrian Mole is truly “a phenomenon” (The Washington Post).
The Public Confessions of a Middle-Aged Woman Sue Townsend 2003-04-24 The Public Confessions of a Middle-Aged Woman (Aged 553⁄4) is a wonderful collection of non-fiction pieces, giving us an insight into Sue's hilarious world Sue Townsend is the much-loved comic author who brought us the bestselling Adrian Mole series Enter the world of Susan Lilian Townsend - sun-worshippers, work-shy writers, garden centre lovers and those in search of a good time are all welcome ... This sparkling collection of Sue Townsend's hilarious non-fiction covers everything from hosepipe bans to Spanish restaurants, from writer's block to slug warfare, from slob holidays to the banning of beige. These funny, perceptive and touching pieces reveal Sue, ourselves and the nation in an extraordinary new light. Sit back and chortle away as one of Britain's most popular and acclaimed writers takes a feather to your funny bone. The Public Confessions of a Middle-Aged Woman (Aged 553⁄4) is Sue Townsend's brilliantly witty collection on non-fiction pieces. 'Anyone who loved The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole will enjoy this collection of witty and sharply observed jottings from the inimitable Sue Townsend. Great stuff' OK! 'Full of homely, hilarious asides on the absurdities of domestic existence ... What a fantastic advertisement for middle-age - it can't be bad if it's this funny' Heat 'A welcome addition to any bookshelf' Hello! 'It's as if Townsend has caught our idiosyncrasies on candid camera and is showing a rerun of all the silly clips ... the ideal dip-in-and-out book' Time Out Sue Townsend is Britain's favourite comic author. Her hugely successful novels include eight Adrian Mole books, The Public Confessions of a Middle-Aged Woman (Aged 553⁄4), Number Ten, Ghost Children, The Queen and I, Queen Camilla and The Woman Who Went to Bed for a Year, all of which are highly acclaimed bestsellers. She has also written numerous well-received plays. She lives in Leicester, where she was born and grew up.
True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Roberts and Susan Lilian Townsend Sue Townsend 1991-01
Adrian Mole Sue Townsend 2000-10-19 It's 1997. Adrian, 30 is a chef at an up-market restaurant, selling down-market food for ridiculous prices. There, the only person who seems to notice he can't cook is AA Gill. But problems abound when, in a fit of madness, he agrees to become a TV chef on the show Offally Good.
The Woman who Went to Bed for a Year Sue Townsend 2012 The day her gifted twins leave home for university, Eva climbs into bed and stays there. For seventeen years she's wanted to yell at the world, 'Stop! I want to get off'. Finally, this is her chance. Perhaps she will be able to think.Her husband Dr Brian Beaver, an astronomer who divides his time between gazing at the expanding universe, an unsatisfactory eight-year-old affair with his colleague Titania and mooching in his shed, is not happy. Who will cook dinner? Eva, he complains, is either having a breakdown or taking attention-seeking to new heights.But word of Eva's refusal to get out of bed quickly spreads.Alexander the dreadlocked white-van man arrives to help Eva dispose of all her clothes and possessions and bring her tea and toast. Legions of fans are writing to her or gathering in the street to catch a glimpse of this 'angel'. Her mother Ruby is unsympathetic: 'She'd soon get out of bed if her arse was on fire.'And, though the world keeps intruding, it is from the confines of her bed that Eva at last begins to understand freedom.The Woman Who Went to Bed for a Year is a funny and touching novel about what happens when someone stops being the person everyone wants them to be. Sue Townsend, Britain's funniest writer for over three decades, has written a brilliant novel that eviscerates modern family life.Sue Townsend is Britain's favourite comic author. Her hugely successful novels include eight Adrian Mole books, The Public Confessions of a Middle-Aged Woman (Aged 55¾), Number Ten, Ghost Children, The Queen and I and Queen Camilla, all of which are highly acclaimed bestsellers. She has also written numerous well-received plays. She lives in Leicester, where she was born and grew up.
Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction Sue Townsend 2006-11-01 A rollicking comic adventure starring “one of literature’s most endearing figures” (The Observer). Readers worldwide have loved Adrian Mole ever since he wrote his first diary at age thirteen and three quarters. Now he is age thirty-four and three quarters—not quite fully grown up, but getting there. In this “funny and wrenching,” novel Adrian needs proof that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction so he can get a refund from a travel agency of the deposit he paid on a trip to Cyprus (Publishers Weekly). Naturally, he writes to Tony Blair for some evidence . He’s engaged to the woman he loves, but obsessed with her voluptuous sister. And he is so deeply in debt to banks and credit card companies that it would take more than twice his monthly salary to ever repay them. He also needs a guest speaker for his creative writing group’s dinner in Leicestershire, and wonders if the prime minister’s wife is available. In short, Adrian is back in true form, unable—like so many people we know, but of course, not us—to admit that the world does not revolve around him . . . In Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction, international-bestselling author Sue Townsend combines “love, politics and credit-card debacle into a not-to-be-missed novel” (The Seattle Times). “The trouble with trying to read passages from the Adrian Mole diaries aloud is that you find yourself laughing so hard you can’t go on.” —The Kansas City Star “Townsend’s wickedly funny novels are another reason to be grateful for the right of free speech.” —San Francisco Chronicle
Ghost Children Sue Townsend 2003-07 The author turns her mordant powers of observation to the serious question of abortion in this poignant & unsparing work of fiction.
Adrian Mole Sue Townsend 2012-01-01 30TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION 'A tour de force by a comic genius and if it isn't the best book published this year, I'll eat my bookshelf' Daily Mail, Books of the Year' Sunday 1st July NO SMOKING DAY A momentous day! Smoking in a public place or place of work is forbidden in England. Though if you a lunatic, a prisoner, an MP or a member of the Royal Family you are exempt. Adrian Mole is thirty-nine and a quarter. He lives in the country in a semi-detached converted pigsty with his wife Daisy and their daughter. His parents George and Pauline live in the adjoining pigsty. But all is not well. The secondhand bookshop in which Adrian works is threatened with closure. The spark has fizzled out of his marriage. His mother is threatening to write her autobiography (A Girl Called Shit). And Adrian's nightly trips to the lavatory have become alarmingly frequent . . . 'Effortlessly hilarious. Brilliant satire and tragedy' The Times 'Hilarious. Comic gold' Sunday Times
The True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole Sue Townsend 2013-01-08 Adrian Mole is an adult. At least that's what it says on his passport. But living at home, clinging to his threadbare cuddly rabbit 'Pinky', working as a paper pusher for the DoE and pining for the love of his life, Pandora, has proved to him that adulthood isn't quite what he expected. Still, without the dilemmas of modern life what would an intellectual poet have to write about...
The Woman who Went to Bed for a Year Sue Townsend 2012 The day her gifted twins leave home for university, Eva climbs into bed and stays there. For seventeen years she's wanted to yell at the world, 'Stop! I want to get off'. Her husband, an astronomer who divides his time between gazing at the expanding universe, an unsatisfactory affair with his colleague and mooching in his shed, is not happy.
The Adrian Mole Diaries Sue Townsend 1985
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4 Sue Townsend 1983 Play version of this novel that was a hit with adults and teenagers alike. In his secret diary, British teenager Adrian Mole excruciatingly details every morsel of his turbulent adolescence. Mixed in with daily reports about the zit sprouting on his chin are heartrending passages about his parents' chaotic marriage. Adrian sees all, and he has something to say about everything. Delightfully self-centered, Adrian is the sort of teenager who could rule a much better world--if only his crazy relatives and classmates would get out of his way. Sue Townsend's play is based on her internationally best-selling book, was created for the Phoenix Arts Leicester, where it received its first production in Septmeber 1984. This volume contains the complete text of the play with introductory notes on the staging by the author; the complete words of the lyrics and music for the melody line of each of the tunes.
The Queen and I Sue Townsend 2012 The Monarchy has been dismantled When a Republican party wins the General Election, their first act in power is to strip the royal family of their assets and titles and send them to live on a housing estate in the Midlands. Exchanging Buckingham Palace for a two-bedroomed semi in Hell Close (as the locals dub it), caviar for boiled eggs, servants for a social worker named Trish, the Queen and her family learn what it means to be poor among the great unwashed. But is their breeding sufficient to allow them to rise above their changed circumstance or deep down are they really just like everyone else? 'No other author could imagine this so graphically, demolish the institution so wittily and yet leave the family with its human dignity intact.' The Times 'Absorbing, entertaining . . . the funniest thing in print since Adrian Mole.' Ruth Rendell, Daily Telegraph 'Kept me rolling about until the last page.' Daily Mail www.suetownsend.com
Adrian Mole Sue Townsend 2012 30TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION 'With the Mole books, Townsend has an unrivalled claim to be this country's foremost practising comic novelist' Mail on Sunday Wednesday August 13th Here I am again - in my old bedroom. Older, wiser, but with less hair, unfortunately. The atmosphere in this house is very bad. The dog looks permanently exhausted. Every time the phone rings my mother snatches it up as though a kidnapper were on the line. Adrian Mole is thirty, single and a father. His cooking at a top London restaurant has been equally mocked ('the sausage on my plate could have been a turd' - AA Gill) and celebrated (will he be the nation's first celebrity offal chef?). And the love of his life, Pandora Braithwaite, is the newly elected MP for Ashby-de-la-Zouch - one of 'Blair's Babes'. He is frustrated, disappointed and undersexed. But a letter from Adrian's past is about to change everything . . . 'Adrian Mole really is a brilliant comic creation. Every sentence is witty and well thought out, and the whole has reverberations beyond itself' The Times 'One of the greatest comic creations. I can't remember a more relentlessly funny book' Daily Mirror
The Adrian Mole Diaries Sue Townsend 2010-11-09 Adrian Mole faces the same agonies that life sets before most adolescents: trouble s with girls, school, parents, and an uncaring world. The difference, though, between young Master Mole and his peers is that this British lad keeps a diary—an earnest chronicle of longing and disaster that has charmed more than five million readers since its two-volume initial publication. From teenaged Adrian’s anguished adoration of a lovely, mercurial schoolmate to his view of his parents’ constantly creaking relationship to his heartfelt but hilarious attempts at cathartic verse, here is an outrageous triumph of deadpan—and deadly accurate—satire. ABBA, Princess Di’s wedding, street punks, Monty Python, the Falklands campaign . . . all the cultural pageantry of a keenly observed era marches past the unique perspective of Sue Townsend’s brilliant comic creation: A . Mole, the unforgettable lad whose self-absorption only gets funnier as his life becomes more desperate.
The Great Celestial Cow Sue Townsend 2014-07-21 A play by one of Britain's best-selling writers When Sita and her children leave India to join her husband in England, she is forced to sell her cow, but she keeps her milking bucket in the hope that she will be able to buy another cow in Leicester. But England is nothing like she expected: faced with prejudice from the English and restrictions of tradition from her family, Sita clings to the dream of the cow and some sense of her own identity. "The Great Celestial Cow is a little gem...It's very funny, touching, telling and moving...here is a story with much to say...I kept bursting into spontaneous applause." Robin Thornber, Guardian
Adrian Mole Sue Townsend 1994 Presents the latest diaries of young Master Mole, whose private musings represent the reflections of a misunderstood and muddled soul
Adrian Mole, The Early Years Sue Townsend 2018-03-27 British adolescent angst has never been so “laugh-out-loud funny” (The New York Times)—the journey begins with these first two books in the heartbreakingly hilarious series. Commiserate with “one of literature’s most endearing figures” (The Observer)—a sharp-witted, pining, and achingly honest underdog of great expectations and dwindling patience who knows all (or believes he does) and tells all. First published in 1982, Adrian Mole’s chronicle of angst has sold more than 20 million copies worldwide, spawned seven sequels, been adapted for television, and staged as a musical—truly “a phenomenon” (The Washington Post). The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13and ¾: Adrian Mole must amass his grievances—his acne vulgaris is grotesque; his crush, Pandora, has received seventeen Valentine’s Day cards (seventeen!); his PE teacher is a sadist; he fears his parents’ marriage is over since they no longer smoke together; his dog has gone AWOL; no one appreciates his poetry; and Animal Farm has set him off pork for good. If everyone were as appalled as Adrian Mole, it would be a better world. For now, for us, it’s just “screamingly funny” (The Sunday Times). The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole: Growing up among inferiors in Great Britain isn’t easy for a sensitive “poet of the Midlands” like Adrian, considering everything in the world is conspiring to scar him for life—his hormones are in a maelstrom; his mother is pregnant (at her age!); his girlfriend is in shut down; and he’s become allergic to non-precious metals. As his “crisply hilarious saga” (Booklist) continues, the changes Adrian undergoes will surely be profound. “Townsend’s wit is razor sharp” (Daily Mirror) as she shows us the world through the haunted eyes of her luckless teenage diarist and self-proclaimed “undiscovered intellectual,” proving again and again why she’s been called “a national treasure” (The New York Times Book Review).
True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Rober and Susan Lilian Townsend Sue Townsend 2012 30TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION 'One of literature's most endearing figures. Mole is an excellent guide for all of us' Observer Monday June 13th I had a good, proper look at myself in the mirror tonight. I've always wanted to look clever, but at the age of twenty years and three months I have to admit that I look like a person who has never even heard of Jung or Updike. Adrian Mole is an adult. At least that's what it says on his passport. But living at home, clinging to his threadbare cuddly rabbit 'Pinky', working as a paper pusher for the DoE and pining for the love of his life, Pandora, has proved to him that adulthood isn't quite what he expected. Still, without the slings and arrows of modern life what else would an intellectual poet have to write about . . . Included here are two other less well-known diarists: Sue Townsend and Margaret Hilda Roberts, a rather ambitious grocer's daughter from Grantham. 'Essential reading for Mole followers' Times Educational Supplement 'Townsend has held a mirror up to the nation and made us happy to laugh at what we see in it' Sunday Telegraph
Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction Sue Townsend 2004 The continuing saga of Adrian Mole, a middle-aged bookseller and single parent, who worries about many things, including his engagement to Marigold Flowers. Will he find it in himself to break off his engagement to the tenacious Marigold and start a meaningful relationship with her sister?
The Secret Diary & Growing Pains of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3⁄4 Sue Townsend 2017-03-23 Get yourself TWO BOOKS IN ONE for this amazing price. 'I not only wept, I howled and hooted and had to get up and walk around the room and wipe my eyes so that I could go on reading' Tom Sharpe THE MUST-HAVE CHRISTMAS GIFT for devoted Adrian Mole fans. Celebrate Adrian Mole's 50th Birthday with this new double edition, featuring the FIRST TWO BOOKS in the hilarious collection and see life through the spectacles of a misunderstood boy growing up in the early 1980s. --------------------------- Friday January 2nd I felt rotten today. It's my mother's fault for singing 'My Way' at two o'clock in the morning at the top of the stairs. Just my luck to have a mother like her. There is a chance my parents could be alcoholics. Next year I could be in a children's home. Meet Adrian Mole, a hapless teenager providing an unabashed, pimples-and-all glimpse into adolescent life. Telling us candidly about his parents' marital troubles, The Dog, his life as a tortured poet and 'misunderstood intellectual', his love for the divine Pandora and his horror at learning of his mother's pregnancy, Adrian's painfully honest diary is a hilarious and heartfelt chronicle of misspent adolescence. Features the complete texts of The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3⁄4 and The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole. 'I've never experienced a greater sense of recognition than when reading The Secret Diary' David Nicholls 'Every sentence is witty and well thought out, and the whole has reverberations beyond itself' The Times 'Townsend has held a mirror up to the nation and made us happy to laugh at what we see in it' Sunday Telegraph 'One of the great comic creations' Daily Mirror 'The funniest person in the world' Caitlin Moran
Number 10 Sue Townsend 2004-11 “Townsend has a rare gift … wickedly funny.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred) “It’s not pretty, it’s not subtle, but it’s wickedly funny and skewers London’s prime-time players.”—Columbus Dispatch Praise for Sue Townsend: “It’s a good thing British subjects are no longer beheaded for treason, or Sue Townsend’s head would roll . . . outrageously cutting.”—Newsday “[Townsend] is a national treasure.”—The New York Times Book Review Edward Clare, PM of England, doesn’t know the price of a liter of milk. Worse, he’s admitted it on national television. The public that ushered him to a landslide election has turned against him. Edward decides the only way to get closer to the men and women on the street is to travel the country dressed in drag. Leaving his high-powered, ambitious wife to attend to things in his absence, he sets out. In this comic romp Sue Townsend sends up, roasts, hoists and generally petards the once and future prime ministers as only she can. Sue Townsend is celebrated as the author of the bestselling Adrian Mole series, read by millions, as well as the #1 British bestseller, The Queen and I. She lives in Leicester, England.
Sue Townsend Boxed Set Sue Townsend 1997-03-01
Adrian Mole: The Collected Poems Sue Townsend 2017-03-16 'It's really, really, really funny' David Walliams Mole Press - a brand new imprint of Penguin Books - is proud to announce the first publication of The Collected Poems of Adrian Mole to mark the author's 50TH birthday. --------------------------- 'Edgy politics, tortured eroticism, misunderstood intellect, changing Britain - a whiff of the sublime. Mole's contribution is significant' Daily Telegraph Featuring poems scattered over nearly thirty years of writing and salvaged from the diaries 'authored' by one Sue Townsend, this slim volume features more than thirty pieces of Adrian's unique art. From his timeless first documented poem - The Tap - via classic odes to his muse, first and only true love Pandora (I adore ya), we follow Adrian's life in verse form. We not only witness his burgeoning political anger in works like Mrs Thatcher (Do you weep, Mrs Thatcher, do you weep?) but also see in later poems his merciless examination of the hollow shell of masculinity as well as documenting his declining libido in tragic pieces like To My Organ. For the first time in a single volume, these are the collected poems of misunderstood intellectual and tortured poet Adrian Mole. 'I ruthlessly exploited Adrian. But he can't afford to sue me' Sue Townsend 'Wonderfully funny and sharp as knives' Sunday Times 'One of the great comic creations' Daily Mirror 'The funniest person in the world' Caitlin Moran
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4 Sue Townsend 1992 The Heinemann Plays series offers contemporary drama and classic plays in durable classroom editions. Many have large casts and an equal mix of boy and girl parts. This play is an adaptation of the humorous diary of a young intellectual, suffering the traumas of love, parental divorce and spots.
Number Ten Sue Townsend 2012-01-01 Behind the doors of the most famous address in the country, all is not well. Edward Clare was voted into Number Ten after a landslide election victory. But a few years later and it is all going wrong. The love of the people is gone. The nation is turning against him. Panicking, Prime Minister Clare enlists the help of Jack Sprat, the policeman on the door of No 10, and sets out to discover what the country really thinks of him. In disguise, they venture into the great unknown: the mean streets of Great Britain. And for the first time in years, the Prime Minister experiences everything life in this country has to offer - an English cream tea, the kindness of strangers, waiting for trains that never come and treatment in a hospital - and at last he remembers some of things he once really cared about . . . 'Wickedly entertaining. There is a gem on nearly every page. Nothing escapes Townsend's withering pen. Satirical, witty, observant . . . a clever book.' Observer 'A delight. Genuinely funny . . . compassion shines through the unashamedly ironic social commentary.' Guardian 'Poignant, hilarious, heart-rending, devastating.' New Statesman 'Hilarious. Sue Townsend's laughter is infectious.' John Mortimer, Sunday Telegraph Books of the Year www.suetownsend.com
Adrian Mole, from Minor to Major Sue Townsend 1991 All the mole diaries plus the further diaries for 1989-1990.
Adrian Mole from Minor to Major Sue Townsend 1992 All the Mole diaries in one volume, including material from the mature Adrian.
Adrian Mole: The Wilderness Years Sue Townsend 2018-01-02 Can an adult still have a secret diary? Everyone’s favorite angsty adolescent Brit is now a tormented twentysomething and still “a brilliant comic creation” (The Times). Question: What have I done with my life? Answer: Nothing. At 23¾ years old, Adrian Mole is now an adult and almost prepared. On the upside: He’s fallen for a perfectly lovely Nigerian waitress; he’s seeing a therapist so as to talk about himself without interruption; and he’s added vowels to his experimental novel-in-progress (so much more accessible to the masses!). The downside? Pandora is probably history; a pea-brained rival has been published before him to great acclaim; and worse, Adrian realizes he may not be uncommon after all. In fact, he may fall somewhere within the range of normalcy. How can an intellectual be expected to live with that? “Thank God for Sue Townsend and Adrian Mole” (The Observer). Her “achingly funny anti-hero” (Daily Mail) returns to take the world by storm—or least weather it—in the beloved bestselling series from “one of Britain’s most celebrated comic writers” (The Guardian). Adrian’s continuing chronicle of angst has sold more than twenty million copies worldwide, and been adapted for television and staged as a musical—truly “a phenomenon” (The Washington Post).
Rebuilding Coventry Sue Townsend 2013-01-31 From the bestselling author of the Adrian Mole series and The Woman who Went to Bed for a Year comes a brilliant, laugh-out-loud satire on modern Britain and the battle of the sexes 'There are two things that you should know about me immediately: the first is that I am beautiful, the second is that yesterday I killed a man. Both things were accidents . . .' When Midlands housewife Coventry Dakin kills her neighbour in a wild bid to prevent him from strangling his wife, she goes on the run. Finding herself alone and friendless in London she tries to lose herself in the city's maze of streets. There, she meets a bewildering cast of eccentric characters. From Professor Willoughby D'Eresby and his perpetually naked wife Letitia to Dodo, a care-in the-community inhabitant of Cardboard City, all of whom contrive to change Coventry in ways she could never have foreseen . . .
The Queen and I Sue Townsend 1993 Theatre program.
Adrian Mole: The Prostrate Years Sue Townsend 2018-01-02 The final chapter in the beloved chronicles of an angsty Brit begun in The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾ is “a tour de force by a comic genius” (Daily Mail). Am I turning into one of those middle-aged men who think the country has gone to the dogs and that there has been no decent music since Abba? Hard to believe! Adrian Mole is pushing forty, a beleaguered bookseller looking back through the wistful eyes of an unrecognized intellectual and, admittedly, pretty much of an Everyman. But he’s also looking forward, despite a few things: His five-year-old daughter is showing alarming Stalinist traits; his son is fighting the Taliban and he’s worried sick; his unfaithful wife is keeping a diary of her own and it’s all rather heartbreaking; frequent urination has made him fear trouble “down there;” and his mother is penning a misery memoir that is one gross slog of a lie (born an aristocrat in a Norfolk potato field, indeed!). Then one day he receives a phone call out of the blue from the great and only love his life: Pandora Braithwaite. “Do you think of me?” she asks. Only ever since he was 13¾ . . . Adrian Mole’s epic and hilarious chronicle of angst over a quarter century has sold more than twenty million copies worldwide, and been adapted for television and staged as a musical—truly “a phenomenon” (The Washington Post). This final volume is “like rediscovering an old school friend on Facebook” (Time Out), and “if [it] isn’t the best book published this year, I’ll eat my bookshelf” (Daily Mail).

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